понедельник, 1 августа 2016 г.

Old Los Angeles, Hollywood photos site

Old Los Angeles, Hollywood photos site


Old Los Angeles, Hollywood photos site


Bunker Hill


Home movies:


https://youtu.be/A-I2kLNwBak


Quote


In the 1940s and 1950s, Bunker Hill was a popular film setting, especially in the film noir genre, because of its Victorian homes, its rambling hillside apartments and flophouses, its funicular Angels Flight, and its mean (or at least mean-looking) streets. It was used extensively in such crime films as Cry Danger (1951),Kiss Me Deadly (1956), Criss Cross (1949), Joseph Losey's M (1951) and Angel's Flight (1965).


Quote


In 1867, a wealthy developer, Prudent Beaudry, purchased a majority of the hill's land. Because of the hill's excellent views of the Los Angeles Basin and the Los Angeles River, he knew that it would make for an opulent subdivision. He developed the peak of Bunker Hill with lavish two-story Victorian houses that became famous as homes for the upper-class residents of Los Angeles. Angels Flight, now dubbed \"The World's Shortest Railway\", took residents homeward from the bottom of the 33% grade and down again.


Initially a residential suburb, Bunker Hill retained its exclusive character through the end of World War I, but in the face of increased urban growth fed by an extensive streetcar system, its wealthy residents began leaving for enclaves on the Westside and Pasadena. Bunker Hill's houses were increasingly sub-divided to accommodate renters. Still, Bunker Hill was at this time \"Los Angeles's most crowded and urban neighborhood\". By World War II the Pasadena Freeway, built to bring shoppers downtown, was taking more residents out. Additional post-war freeway construction left downtown comparatively empty of both people and services. The once-grand Victorian mansions of Bunker Hill became the home of impoverished pensioners.


A 1949 episode of the Philip Marlowe radio show has the hero refer to Bunker Hill as a slum\".


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In 1955, Los Angeles city planners decided that Bunker Hill required a massive slum-clearance project. The top of Bunker Hill was cleared of its houses and then flattened as the first stage of the Bunker Hill Redevelopment Project to populate Bunker Hill with modern plazas and buildings.


http://www.messyness...own-la/castle3/


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In the 1950s, the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency came up with a drastic redevelopment plan for the entire Bunker Hill area and by 1968, every last Victorian home of Bunker Hill Avenue had been demolished. These pictures show the last surviving houses, the Castle and another Victorian home, the Salt Box, being relocated by preservationists to another site in the 1960s, only to end up getting torched by vandals soon after.


The admin of this website has written a book about Bunker Hill in the movies


http://www.electrice...labh/index.html


Act Of Violence:


Kiss Me Deadly:


Quote


The crew of M sets up a shot at the Alta Vista Apartments at 255 S. Bunker hill, where the murderer's first victim lived. John Fante lived at the Alta Vista in the early Thirties and wrote about it in Ask the Dust.


Hibi, on 05 Mar 2015 - 3:17 PM, said:


Has skid row today always been skid row? (the Main St. area?)


There was a poor end of downtown in 1953, but no drunks or bums living on the streets.


Back in those days, hobos lived in the woods or rural areas just outside of towns, often around main-line railroad tracks, such as in SULLIVAN'S TRAVELS, MY MAN GODFREY, and many other movies, Cities generally banned sleeping on the sidewalk, tents on sidewalks, etc.


Interesting about downtown LA. Most of its movie theaters still exist (as opposed to other cities where they were torn down) Many are closed, or used for other purpuses, but some of them have been restored (like the Orpheum ) I've heard the United Artists is coming back as something else or is that the Million Dollar? Maybe both of them.........


Has skid row today always been skid row? (the Main St. area?)


FredCDobbs, on 02 Mar 2015 - 3:37 PM, said:


Norma Desmond at the Paramount gate:


That was actually the side gate they used in the film, wasnt it?


FredCDobbs, on 02 Mar 2015 - 12:44 PM, said:


Los Angeles River before it was paved in 1938:


When it was an actual river. LOL.


traceyk65, on 05 Mar 2015 - 2:20 PM, said:


Not to mention that in those days there probably weren't many people in Hollywood who took pictures of anyone but respectable, well-dressed people. Would have ruined the image...


I went shopping in downtown L.A. in 1953 and there were no hobos, tent cities, or bums living on the sidewalks back then.


Dargo, on 02 Mar 2015 - 6:12 PM, said:


Well, maybe 'cause bein' homeless in the sunny and warm confines of Downtown L.A. beats bein' homeless in some large eastern city's downtown, and where you'd be freezin' your freakin' a$$ off this time of year, EH???!!!


(...if you'd be homeless, that is...wait...even IF you HAD a home back there, come to THINK of IT!!!)


LOL


Not to mention that in those days there probably weren't many people in Hollywood who took pictures of anyone but respectable, well-dressed people. Would have ruined the image...


FredCDobbs, on 02 Mar 2015 - 5:47 PM, said:


Why has civilization in downtown Los Angeles gone downhill so much?


Well, maybe 'cause bein' homeless in the sunny and warm confines of Downtown L.A. beats bein' homeless in some large eastern city's downtown, and where you'd be freezin' your freakin' a$$ off this time of year, EH???!!!


(...if you'd be homeless, that is...wait...even IF you HAD a home back there, come to THINK of IT!!!)


LOL


Where are all the shanty towns and the hobo tents on the sidewalks in the 1920s photos?


What has changed during the past 80 years?


Everyone in the old photos is neatly dressed. There are no dope dealers on the street. There were blacks and Mexicans in Los Angeles at that time, neatly dressed and in the movie business and other businesses, but not sleeping on the streets.


Photo from Los Angeles Public Library:


Why has civilization in downtown Los Angeles gone downhill so much?


Modern downtown L.A. photo:


Busy downtown Los Angeles, 1920s:


Norma Desmond at the Paramount gate:


These old Hollywood photos are from Tracy's link:


http://www.martintur...com/photo-blog/


Go down to the bottom of each page and click on the lower left link for more.


Aerial view of MGM’s Circus Maximus set from “Ben Hur” (1925) This aerial shot of MGM’s 1925 version of “Ben Hur” intersection makes me shake my head in wonder. In the movie it all looks to grand, but when you look at it like this, it doesn’t look all that impressive. What impresses me more is all that vacant land! This scene was shot at the corner of La Cienega and Venice Boulevards, just below the 10 Freeway. There sure as hell ain’t no room for no Circus Maximus there now.


Paramount Pictures main gate under construction, 1925.


Looking west along Hollywood Blvd toward Highland Ave, 1936


Staff photograph at the Walt Disney Studios, Silver Lake, 1932


Samuel Goldwyn’s studio lot, Washington Blvd, Culver City, 1918


Before the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer merger in 1924, the studio lot at 10202 W. Washington Boulevard, Culver City was Samuel Goldwyn’s. This photo was taken in 1918 and you can see the colonnaded gate (circled in red) which became famous as the gates through with the MGM stars entered the studio. Those columns are still there and every time I drive past them, I refuse to acknowledge that they now belong to Sony. In my mind, they’re still “the MGM columns.”


Los Angeles River before it was paved in 1938:


Hollywood Blvd, looking East, 1930s:


Huntington Beach, 1940:


Original article and pictures take http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/52327-old-los-angeles-hollywood-photos-site site

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